Our Mental Facilities 1800's project

February 24, 2014

Reflecting on the project (Chloe)

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Adams, Chloe @ 11:26 am

When I started this project I had very little knowledge about this topic. I thought that mental hospitals were about the same as the hospitals we have today, but as I started to learn more about this topic I realized I was very wrong. As I started to learn more about this particular topic I gained more of an understanding of  how things really were, like bad living conditions, horrible unnecessary treatments, and most of all unreasonable admissions to the hospital. As I went along with the research I learned a lot of useful information for this topic like who started the health reform, how people were treated in the hospitals, and why they were out into the hospitals. I made a few connections to other topics one of the topics I found a connection to was  jail reform, because in jails they were beating the mentally ill, chaining them to the walls and treating them very badly, and the jail reform was to help and make the conditions better for the mentally ill in the jails. The reason I made this connection was because in the mental health reform they tried and did make conditions better for the mentally ill, they did the same thing in the jails at this time so they people could be safer. My biggest AHHA moment was when I found out that Benjamin Rush was  apart of this reform and many others so he was like a hero that  no one gave credit to, but that was my biggest AHHA moment. If I could continue with my research I would have gone and found the books that were wrote about this topic and stories of people who lived in these horrible places and talked about them.

I learned  that curating  is harder then just collecting information, because when you are a curator you have to put the information that you find into a fun and interesting way for the people to get into it, and when you are just collecting information it’s just a bunch of facts that are most likely bullet pointed and boring but curators put the info in fun ways that we can understand. I had a bunch of failures but also some successes, most of my failures are me not doing what I need to do at home and as a student, but my few successes are that I did get most of my research done and finished but I still did not help my partner as much as I wanted to. If I could do this project over again I would do more of my work at home even when I am sick, so my partner would not have to do all of it on her own. This project could help me if my high school history teacher had me do a project or paper on this topic, then I could look at my blog and have prier knowledge about this topic.

I learned that technology can be very helpful when it comes to research or any paper. The web or internet can be a very helpful tool when you do research or anything of that sort, just make sure you have key words to narrow down your search. I could use blogs in the future for any type of research or paper but I will always make sure there is a citation at the bottom. I have learned that I need help coming up with topics sometimes and that I am not a go getter when it comes to research. This project helped me see that I need to be more codependent with my research. 🙂

Reflecting on the project (Gabi)

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Roehr, Gabriella @ 11:10 am

I started out this project having little knowledge on the subject. I thought that mental hospitals in the 1800’s were just like normal hospitals, I was very wrong. As I learned more about the topic I gained more of an understanding of how things really were in the mental hospitals; horrible conditions, and unfair treatments. I learned so much about mental health care! Also this project connects to other projects because Dr.Rush who played a big part in mental health care also played a big in other movements of the time. The biggest AHHA moment I had was when I realized that these people really had no one to take care of them and that they’re families just kinda abandoned them at these mental hospitals because they weren’t fit for society or something and that made me really sad 🙁 I would continue to research Nellie Bly because I started a post on her but couldn’t finish it.

The difference between curating and collecting research is that when you curate you write the paragraph or story in a really interesting or appealing way that’s easily understood by readers. Collecting research is when you just find facts and turn them into an essay or a story in a way that tells facts but may not be interesting. My successes were probably finding research and writing it in an interesting way, my failures were probably I could have communicated with my partner better. If I did this project over again I would probably have worked on it more on weekends. This project will definitely help me in the future because it I learned to ask a lot of questions and write posts in a fun to read way.

I learned that there are a lot of interesting useful websites on the internet that had a lot of vital information for the project. I think blogs are super cool, you can write new posts each day with stuff you learned, its kinda like an educational facebook because instead of posting about your life you post about what you learned. I learned that I think a  million questions a minute, I was so interested in the project! I always think that most projects we do in school are boring and I found out that I loved this project and didn’t think it was boring at all! Also, learning and researching the mental hospitals was really intriguing and that not all learning at school is boring 🙂

Well I hope you enjoyed the blog! I know I enjoyed writing it!

February 21, 2014

Stories From the Mental Hospital

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Roehr, Gabriella @ 11:22 am

Here are a collection of wild stories I found about instances in a mental hospital. These stories could be made nowhere else but in the mental hospital. Some are horrifying and some are just down right funny. Enjoy….

In Pilgram Psychiatric Center in Long Island the doctors used to shock the patients with insulin and metrozol and put them in a coma just to get rid of them. In another hospital a patient who was prescribed LSD jumped out of a window and killed himself because he was under the influence of the drug. The doctor who had prescribed him that also had prescribed many other patients LSD without even telling them what he was giving them. The end result their mental illnesses were no better and now they were drug addicts.

The Waverly Hill Sanatorium is credited with 64,000 deaths of patients throughout all the years it was open. People who were admitted there had expirements performed on them and the hospital had horrible conditions.

 

 

 

 

“Top 10 Most Popular Mental Asylum Stories.” – TotallyTop10.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2014

Womens rights in the asylum and out of the asylum.

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Adams, Chloe @ 11:07 am

In the early 1800’s women had very little rights, they could not vote, or own property, women were actually considered property.  So when they got married or was a child there farther or husband could do what ever to them so that also has a big impact on how and why they were put into the asylum. “Women were expected to restrict their sphere of  interest to the home and the family. Women were not encouraged to obtain a real education or pursue a professional career. After marriage, women did not have the right to own their own property, keep their own wages, or sign a contract.” (1) So women did not have the choice of going to the asylums or not, it was there farther or husbands idea to put them in to the asylum.(1) (Chloes point of view) I think that women should of had more rights, but also if women had more rights then we would not of had as much of this problem of husbands and fathers putting the wives and children in to the asylum with out valid reason.

"Female Asylum Patients." Cantonasylumforinsaneindians.com/history_blog/tag/alienists. N.p., 3 May 2012. Web. 21 Feb. 2014.

“Female Asylum Patients.” Cantonasylumforinsaneindians.com/history_blog/tag/alienists. N.p., 3 May 2012. Web. 21 Feb. 2014.

 

(1)”Rights For Women: The Suffrage Movement and Its Leaders.” Http://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/rightsforwomen/introduction.html. National Women’s History Museum, 2007. Web. 21 Feb. 2014.

 

Patients life

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Roehr, Gabriella @ 11:01 am

In 1830 the treatment called the “moral treatment” was used to treat mentally ill people. It made it so the patients could be comfortable and happy while staying at the mental hospital. So I got to thinking, I’ve done posts in the past talking about the treatments and conditions of the mental asylums, but I wondered, what did the patients do the rest of the time?

Some leisure activities included: Farming, working in the field, or taking care of farm animals for the men, and sewing, mending, or house hold chores for women. Also, they greatly encourage reading, for it relaxed the patients and was therapeutic. Families of the patients were greatly encouraged to visit their family members while they were staying in the mental hospital. The mental hospitals had many educational pastimes that the patients could do like, reading maps, and learning science and history.

Reading … is employed as a moral means in the
treatment of insanity. We adopt it as a measure which
serves to occupy the mind to the effacement of delusions
and morbid feelings, at least for a transitory period; it is,
in other words, one of the great revulsive modes of acting
upon the insane mind. Moreover, it serves as a pleasant
method of passing away time, and in this respect exerts a
tranquilizing effect on the individual [3].(John Galt). Reading was the most popular pastime as it was educational and entertaining, so most mental hospitals were equipped with a large library, some had up to 500 volumes! One hospital even had a “sewing party” where the women sewed items in their free-time and then sold the items and raised money for themselves and the other patients in the mental hospital.

For patients recovering from mania, Rush offered
the following suggestion:
“The return of regularity and order in the operation of
the mind will be much aided, by obliging mad people to
read with an audible voice, to copy manuscripts, and to
commit interesting passages from books to memory. By
means of the first, their attention will be more intensely
fixed upon one subject than by conversation. In this way
only, they comprehend what they read….” (1)

I’m glad the conditions are finally clearing up for these poor asylum patients! At least now they can have more of a normal life at the hospital. I read that even sometimes the men would be allowed to make shoes and go out and sell them. Also, I agree with Dr. Rush and John Galt, reading really is the perfect pastime for the patients. It doesn’t involve being social so there’s no reason for them to get violent and crazy, and it make them turn all their attention to what their reading so they can somewhat forget where they were for the moment being.

 

 

Dunkel, L. M. “Moral and Humane: Patients’ Libraries in Early Nineteenth-century American Mental Hospitals.” US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health. Medical Library Association, n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

 

What did men do in the asylum?

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Adams, Chloe @ 10:35 am

As I was going through my research, all the articles I have seen were about women and children, so I got thinking like were men put into the asylum or just worked there?

Men were put in to the asylum for many reasons some being dipsomaniac (drinking problem), Imbecility (is a form of retardation) , Hallucination (seeing stuff that’s not there), Idiocy (extremely stupid behavior) and many more. If a man was put in to the asylum, then most likely he was mentally ill or challenged. They also put boys in the asylum, but they separated the children from the adults. One story I found about a men being put in the asylum was of a man 43 years in age white and came from Ireland, he was a dipsomaniac, he had trouble with managing how much alcohol he had so he was rendered as un-manageable, so he was arrested with the clam of insanity.(1)

(chloes point of view) I think that they were right when they put men in to the asylum, because they actually have mental disabilities.

http://katcarcat.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/insane-asylums-to-mental-institutions/

http://katcarcat.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/insane-asylums-to-mental-institutions/

 

 

 

(1)”New Orleans (La.) City Insane Asylum.” http://nutrias.org/inv/cityinsaneasylum1_50.htm. New Orleans Public Library, n.d. Web. 20 Feb 2014.

February 20, 2014

The Forgotten Children

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Roehr, Gabriella @ 11:03 am

151 children were brought to Worcester County Asylum during the years of  1854 and 1900. They were all under the age of 17. The conditions were in this hospital and other children’s hospitals were awful.  The children were treated the exact same way as adult psychiatric patients. This contributed to the children patients being unstable, wild, undisciplined and lacking social skills. The children rarely got to see their families, if they got to see them at all. The suicide and death rate was high.

Heilanstalt Schönbrunn, Kinder

en.wikipedia.org

This children’s mental asylum was definitely somewhere you did not want to be.  In previous posts I talked about the treatments and conditions of mental hospitals, just thinking that children had to endure those treatments is just terrifying. Imagine a seven-year-old being chained down whipped, starved, and drugged just for having autism or another learning disability  is truly saddening.

 

 

 

 

“Psychiatric Bulletin.” The Forgotten Children: Children Admitted to a County Asylum between 1854 and 1900. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2014

The conditions of mental facilities in the 1800’s.

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Adams, Chloe @ 10:39 am

“confined in this Commonwealth in cages, closets, cellars, stalls, pens! Chained, beaten with rods, lashed into obedience.” said, Dorothea dix(1) I looked at a lot of pictures and paintings for this time period and I can infer  from seeing these pictures that they were not clean, they were disorganized,and  keep everything in a cluster. They did not sweep, and keep everything in its place including the dust and dirt. Also,they did not repaint or anything of that sort,and because of all that I infer that most people got sick or worse in there sickness, also i think most of them ended up dieing at young ages if they were children.  I also saw a few pictures of what the kitchens looked like and they did not have clean dishes or clean anything in the asylum.  Click on the pictures to see them closer.

  1. Rachel, Greenberg. " Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration." NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

    Rachel, Greenberg. ” Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration.” NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

  2. Rachel, Greenberg. " Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration." NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

    Rachel, Greenberg. ” Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration.” NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

  3. Rachel, Greenberg. " Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration." NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

    Rachel, Greenberg. ” Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration.” NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

  4. Rachel, Greenberg. " Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration." NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

    Rachel, Greenberg. ” Afflicted: 11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums “Open” for Exploration.” NileGuide Travel Blog. nileguide, 17 july 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

 

 

(1)”26d. Prison and Asylum Reform.” http://www.ushistory.org/us/26d.asp. Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia. Web. 19 Feb 2014.

February 19, 2014

Abandoned Suitcases

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Roehr, Gabriella @ 11:10 am
abandoned-suitcases-of-insane-asylum-patients-frank-2

Jon Crispin, from Collectors Weekly

As I was doing my research I became curious, wondering what belongings, if any, could these patients bring with them. What I found was this amazing website with pictures of all these old suitcases that the staff working at the Willard Asylum for the Chronic Insane came across when they were closing the asylum. All of the suitcases belonged to patients who had passed away while living at the hospital. These suitcases really tell the stories of the people who were living in the hospitals. Though mentally ill people are looked down upon and are thought not to be regular people who like normal things. The belongings in their suitcases show that they were just normal people. Your heart breaks when you see suitcases full of family pictures knowing that most likely the patients never got to see their family again after they were checked into the mental facility. Most patients brought books and other items of enjoyment to keep them entertained one person even brought her ballet dancing shoes. There were also patients who had been in the military previously. Their suitcases contained pictures of them in uniform and sometimes contained medals.

 

“The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things.” The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Feb.2014

link to website: http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles/abandoned-suitcases-reveal-private-lives-of-insane-asylum-patients/

Why did they put women and kids in mental sanatoriums

Filed under: Uncategorized —— Adams, Chloe @ 10:35 am

In the early 1800’s wives and daughters often became institutionalized because the did not obey their husbands or fathers,(1) one example of this is when a women named Mrs.Elizabeth Parsons Ware Packard was abducted on her husband’s orders and taken to the insane asylum in Jacksonville, Illinois,”  (2) just because her husband did not want to deal with her. Some kids were put in to the sanatorium for many reasons but some are unwanted pregnancies,disobedience or illness such as Down’s Syndrome or Autism. Some other reasons are that they had depression, alcoholism, and when they are just a little bit different from the others or as what they called normal, also when they were going through menopause. (1) (chloe’s point of view) I think that the men should of gotten over the fact that there women were either different or just getting older, i mean if you cant take care of them then find them a different home not put them in a metal hospital.

reasons-for-admission

Reasons Persons were admitted to mental asylums
Kurp, John. “Web Designer Building Fusion Reactor in NYC, Lacks Robotic Arms (For Now).” UPROXX RSS. N.p., 22 Oct. 2013. Web. 13 Feb. 2014.

 

 

1)Tina, Sansone-. “Women and the Insane Asylum.” http://www.tngs.org/library/asylum.htm. N.p.. Web. 12 Feb 2014.

2)Emily, mann. “Mrs.Packard.” http://www.mccarter.org/education/mrs-packard/html/7.html. N.p., 10 june 2007. Web. 12 Feb 2014.

©2017 Our Mental Facilities 1800's project
Hosted by District 20 Blogs